The World’s End

August 27, 2013 by  

Edgar Wright made quite a splash on the horror comedy scene with 2004’s “Shaun of the Dead”, one of the freshest films of the decade and one of my favorite horror comedies of all time–and one of the best zombie films of all time. He followed it up with the darker but still fun and entertaining “Hot Fuzz” in 2007. Now comes the third in what he calls the “Three Flavours Cornetto Trilogy”, “The World’s End”. The plot is quite simple: a bunch of boyhood friends gather together after over 20 years of being apart to try and conquer The Golden Mile, a 12 tavern pub crawl in one night. The man behind the plan is Gary King (Simon Pegg, always appealing, if a little over the top this time), and he is stuck in the past as he wants to recapture the glory days of youth and finish the pub crawl that they could not finish when they were teenagers.

His group of friends, however, have grown up and gone their separate ways. His closest friend, Andy (Nick Frost), has quit drinking and become a business man. His other friends, Pete (Eddie Marsan), Oliver (Martin Freeman), and Steven (Paddy Considine), have also matured into adults. Not all successful, but certainly past being pub crawlers. As for Gary, he hasn’t grown at all. Still has the same car from that night, and the same cassette tape that was playing when they drove there.

The pubs all belong to a town called Newton Haven, where they grew up. They haven’t been back since, nor have they cared to. In some ways, all of their skeletons were left there and they were more than happy to leave them–especially for Andy, who had a falling out with Gary one night that Gary thinks Andy should just get over.

Gary finds all of his buds and is able to convince them to come with him based on telling them a sob story about his Mum dying, and their fascination with him being able to persuade Andy to come along piques their interest. Once together, it’s off to the pubs. But something is different. Each pub is identical, sterile, and the people are different. They’re colder, and quiet. The ones that should remember Gary and the gang don’t seem to recognize them at all.

In the bathroom, Gary finds out what is going on just as the rest of his friends grow restless with the evening. Oliver had invited his sister, Sam (Rosamund Pike), who Steven has had a crush on all these years, and Gary has tried to put moves on her as well. She leaves, disenchanting the others. Andy, who has been drinking water instead of beer, decides it’s time to go. But when they try to collect Gary, they are swarmed with kids resembling androids complete with blue blood and T-1000-like mobility. They’re convinced they’re surrounded by robots, but there’s actually a bigger plot going on. It’s an invasion. Flooding us with technology and brainwashing us with pseudo-pacification, the gang tries to escape being assimilated.

But Gary still wants to get to the World’s End, the last pub of the crawl. Through the chase sequences, we learn more about their relationships with each other and why there was a falling out. It’s almost like “The Big Chill” meets “Invasion of the Body Snatchers”. But Wright doesn’t completely rip off either film. He also merely touches on an apocalyptic story about the downfall of human civilization as we become more and more reliant on technology. It would have been a nice thing for him to really satirize, as it seemed to be leaning in that direction.

It’s still good fun, though; and if you’re a fan of either or both “Shaun of the Dead” and “Hot Fuzz”, this won’t let you down. The performances are strong, the action sequences are exciting, and most of the film moves at a good pace. The only time the film lags is near the end. It’s almost as if Wright didn’t have a real tight grasp on how he wanted to end this one, so it is a bit anticlimactic. While some of this is used for comic effect, it almost starts a whole new story with only about 10 minutes to go in the film. The film’s last scene feels like it could be the first scene of the next film, should he want to make a sequel. Although, since this was part of a “trilogy”, I guess Wright would have to bend the rules.

This is an enjoyable film, but I think it’s the weakest of the three. It’s certainly ambitious and it has some great moments. There are some very funny scenes, and the characters are very likeable, especially Sam and Pete. But there’s something more that could’ve been done with the plot, I think, that would have put it even above “Shaun” and really made a criticism about modern life. Instead it’s nothing more than a heady pint. While that can be satisfying, it still leaves something to desire. Especially if it’s an India Pale Ale.

My rating: :-)

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