Kick-Ass 2

August 19, 2013 by  
Filed under Movies

“Kick-Ass” was a fun, if a bit overviolent romp that put a bit of a realistic spin on the superhero genre. Of course, it wanted to have it both ways: cartoonish violence mixed with realistic violence. In most ways, it worked because it had so much fun with itself and didnt take itself too seriously. With the sequel, it packs on more violence and does the same thing; but it also adds another wrinkle, which is a “sexy” angle that comes off more as just audaciously perverse than it does comical or ironic.

“Kick-Ass 2” again follows the exploits of a group of superheroes who are real people and really have no super powers. Dave, or Kick-Ass, played well again by Aaron Taylor-Johnson, is now a senior in high school with his bombshell girlfriend and is learning to be a better “ass-kicker” basically with the help of Mindy, or Hit-Girl (Chloe Grace Moretz). The two here have great chemistry, and there’s even a bit of tension between them because of what Dave wants to accomplish versus what Mindy isn’t allowed to any longer. She’s basically grounded from being Hit Girl after her father (Big Daddy) was killed in the first film and her guardian, a cop named Marcus, wants to protect her from sharing that same fate.

Meanwhile, Kick-Ass realizes he can’t save the city of New York by himself and instead of being a dynamic duo with Hit-Girl, he is enlisted in a team of crime fighters known as Justice Forever, headed up by Colonel Stars and Stripes (well played by Jim Carrey), a born again ex-mafioso who can either beat you up by himself, or have his dog do it for him. Other heroes include Night Bitch (Lindy Booth) and Dr. Gravity (Donald Faison), the former who begins a bit of a romance with Kick-Ass as they patrol the streets fighting crime.

There’s still a “real world” element in this film that they like to play with: in one scene, a group of punks try recording a fight with Kick-Ass on their phone in the hopes it’ll go viral. In another, the new supervillain The Motherf*cker (Christopher Mintz-Plasse) tweets his rage and want of revenge for Kick-Ass after he killed his father in the first movie, and recruits a group of evildoers in hopes of making an army of villains to take down the city of New York–for no apparent reason.

That’s all well and good, and there are some comic scenes involving these antics that makes the movie fun. But the whole product never seems to be quite right; and, sometimes when the movie is supposed to be funny or goofy, it just comes off as awkward and even offensive. The bigger faux pas is the more sexual angle the film takes. This is handled in a pretty useless subplot involving Mindy and a group of snobs led by Brooke (Claudia Lee) as head cheerleader. This plot feels more like a sequel to “Mean Girls” than it does “Kick-Ass” as Mindy tries to find a new identity for herself, Popular-Girl (sorry). There’s an entire dance sequence that just feels a bit icky if you realize that Lee isn’t even 18 yet in real life; but in terms of importance of the plot, there isn’t any.

This film is completely unadulterated, and unfiltered. I have no issue with that in theory; but you have to execute it correctly. If you’re going to bill the movie as a black comedy or a cartoonish superhero comedy action film, you have to use the right tone, and this film never achieves that. The satire isn’t convincing, there doesn’t seem to be an awareness that some of the humor is tasteless and unworthy, and there are even pacing problems as the film comes to its climax because there has been so much exposition in the previous two acts that try to pull the movie in too many directions. Some of the narration by Kick-Ass makes it seem like you’re watching a synopsis of a film rather than the film itself.

I can’t say I was bored through any of it, or that it was a waste of time. Some of it is very charming; and since this revolves more around Hit-Girl and Moretz is such a good young actress, it can be very appealing. In some ways it wants to be a coming of age story, and it works occasionally. There are humorous scenes, and some big laughs. And of course, the fight scenes are competent. The sequel raises the ante of stakes and ambition. But with great ambition comes great responsibility, and this film really doesn’t want the responsibility. It just wants to wallow in its indulgence. If that were the point, and it was driven home correctly, then I’d say the film did its job. But writer/director Jeff Wadlow and company needed to do a better job of putting it all together. Maybe the comic book series this is based on does that; but then again, in that medium, you can get away with a lot more and pay less consequences. In the movie world, there are rules. And if you’re going to break them, you’d better have a good excuse. This film’s excuse isn’t much better than “the dog ate my homework”.

My rating: :?

Rise of the Planet of the Apes

August 7, 2011 by  
Filed under Movies

Look out, Hollywood! The apes are back! But where’s Estella Warren? Hm? Where are you?? She’s gone…it’s all gone. It’s all been re-booted. In the totally original genre called “re-booting” franchises that was handled with brilliance like in “A Nightmare on Elm Street” (which would have been a hated movie by me if I could have just stayed awake throughout it)…or wait, I think that was just a remake. This is a true re-boot. It’s like “Star Trek”; except, it’s different. There’s no Captain Kirk, for one thing.

So let me tell you the plot because it’s OMG so totally WeSoMEZZ (I just made that up; think it can become a meme?)

It’s about this guy (James Franco, who holds a record of being miscast in films; I think his streak is up to 5 now or something) who wants to treat his dad (the Harry-less John Lithgow, who trades Sasquatch for a chimp) for Alzheimer’s disease by creating a retrovirus called “113” and tests it on apes. The result? The chimps have a heightened intelligence. This is pretty amazing, of course. But it doesn’t impress his boss, played as standard as possible by David Oyelowo (say that five times fast! starting…now!), and so the project is scrapped. Well, there is a test subject that he takes home with him, named Caesar (named after the dressing), and this is no ordinary chimp–it’s a CGI! (Chimp Graphic Interface). Forgive the cheap joke.

Well, Caesar is quite limber and intelligent, and the film spends a few reels showing something that’s very akin to cut-scenes in a video game as we see Caesar grow up and become more intelligent; meanwhile, Dear Old Dad is given a dose of the medicine as well, and it actually works. Unfortunately, it doesn’t last forever…and he replases eventually. Meanwhile, the guy, Will, develops a relationship with a doctor named…oh…you know? I don’t remember. Why? Because she serves no purpose other than to say a few things to Will about how careful he should be. And they kiss at some point. Finally! The film lapses through about 8 years–this girl knows how to hold out.

Also, Caesar starts to really emo out. He gets lonely and sad, and wonders if he’s just considered a pet (which he is), and winds up taking out his self-loathing on a neighbor (who gets a few shots taken at him…but not enough payoff). He is sent to a little…monkey prison, where he is tormented by Draco Malfoy (well, Tom Felton, the guy who played him) to the point where Emo Caesar starts to really get peeved. He befriends the apes in the prison, and they basically break out and wreak havoc.

And that’s actually where this movie is so disappointing! Here you’ve got a pretty entertaining premise, and Andy Serkis is so good as a CGI actor that he’s basically a human special effect…possibly the best ever. But they go so by the book, standard, garden variety, no violence and no real tension…it’s not that it’s boring, it’s just that it’s so sterile! This movie could have had a lot of fun with itself, or gone the complete opposite direction and make it a real bloodbath. Apes just killing and pillaging and whatnot.

Instead, the movie feels like some kind of weird kid’s movie, which is confusing because kids would probably be scared to death of these chimps once they turn, and I gotta believe zoos better be aware that kids need to be told that A) the chimps in the zoo are not computer generated and B) not going to suddenly go America all over your ass.

Yes, the apes hold our attention more than the cardboard cut out human characters; but they’re also given very formulaic personalities that never really lets them breathe…so we get something that could be maybe enjoyed at a Drive-In; but it could have been a really fun movie if it wasn’t so Studio-tweaked.

I wanted to have fun with the movie; but it just didn’t let you in. It looks good, the CGI is well used, and the emo factor is fantastic–all Caesar is missing are the bangs. And maybe a Twitter account. But this movie just doesn’t explore any of the amazing possibilities (like Apes using Twitter) that it had, so we’re left with a very banal and standard action film that’s so synthetic that we can’t connect with any of it.

I can only hope the sequels do something more; but I highly doubt that’ll happen.

Maybe they could at least use LinkedIn though…

My rating: :(

Iron Man 2

May 17, 2010 by  
Filed under Featured Content, Movies

Comic book movie sequels can be a conundrum. While you already have the pressure of being a sequel already, most of the time you’re given the chance to flesh out your hero a little more and give them another villain to work with. You do, however, have the advantage of a lot more material to work with. Marvel is the most prominent icon in comic book movies today, with the successes of The “Spiderman” series, the “X-Men” series, a revamped “Hulk” series, and of course the first “Iron Man”. But the “Iron Man” series has a different kind of approach to its sequel because the function of its hero, Tony Stark, isn’t a tortured soul like Peter Parker or Bruce Banner. He’s actually a charismatic billionaire who loves life and loves his money. So the angle here isn’t about morphing into a monster or using super hero strength to counter a nerdy teenage existence. Quite simply, “Iron Man” is about one thing:

Toys. Tony Stark loves his main toy, the Iron Man suit with all its bells and whistles and impossible awesomeness. He doesn’t believe it should go to the military to be used in some liberal agenda. He also believes he’s the only one who can be trusted enough to use it. Copycats have tried and failed; except for an ex-con in Russian whose father used to work with Tony’s father and was exiled from the project. The Russian, played by Mickey Rourke in a very underused role, creates a suit that can rival Iron Man’s power and ability. It also happens to look pretty cool.

Meanwhile, Tony is tangled up in a plot with a group called S.H.I.E.L.D. that knows Tony’s suit can be useful; but Tony himself is useless. Scarlett Johansson plays Black Widow (though she’s never referred to that code name in the fim; she’s Natasha or Natalie), part of the organization, and Samuel L. Jackson plays Nick Fury.

Also, Ivan (Rourke) is lured into a scheme by a rival gun maker named Justin Hammer (Sam Rockwell) to build a better Iron Man suit so he can upstage Tony Stark.

This is all well and good, and I think the movie tries to show off how cool it is a little too much. The thing I liked so much about the first film was that it was surprisingly charming and interesting as well as being pretty good to look at. The final battle scene was as hokey as they come; but by that time, the film was already likable enough to where I didn’t care.

But a sequel was not going to really be surprising. We knew what we were getting, ultimately. This wasn’t going to be like “Superman II” or “Spider-man II” or even “X-Men 2”. There was no real growth for Tony. Tony is Tony. He has a bit of a problem with his ticker, but it doesn’t really change who he is. This one’s just louder and more stuff gets blowed up. In a somewhat self-serving and indulgent scene, Tony and his long time pal Rhodey (played this time by Don Cheadle instead of Terrence Howard) get into a big macho fight that leaves Tony’s pad really busted up. And of course their friendship is kind of hurt at that point.

The movie is very predictable and not as enjoyable as the first. There’s a freshness missing; and while Downey, Jr. and Rourkey provide entertaining characters and some nice moments, the movie still is what it is: it’s just an action film. Sure, that’s fine. I still enjoyed that part of it. Perhaps this series is a bit doomed in that regard. Tony will never NOT be Tony, nor will he have room to grow to be more mature. He’s fun and charming, but there’s not anything flawed enough in him to make a real change. In other words, there’s not as much at stake. Not for his character or what will happen to his life. He puts on a suit that’s able to be pulverized by an electronic whip and still survive. He’s still insanely rich; and the future’s bright. I’m not sure where else this story needs to go.

But if there is going to be an “Iron Man 3”, which I feel there will, I think it’s a mistake. The next project for this would be a “S.H.I.E.L.D.” film, or the Avengers. I think the last bit at the end of the film credits reveals that’s probably inevitable. I think that may be a lot more fun than seeing a guy fly around in a metal suit blowing stuff up for two hours for a third time.

My rating: : :|