Godzilla (2014)

May 28, 2014 by  
Filed under Movies

I suppose it’s not really a necessity to have another Godzilla film, especially made in America–but if we were going to have one, this one is certainly passable. It has a very complex plot for a monster film (but then again, so did “Pacific Rim”), and it misses out on a few notes in its character narrative; but as a monster film, it’s pitch perfect. We don’t get to see the King of the Monsters in all his glory for a long time; but when we do, it’s pretty fantastic.

The story begins with a credit sequence that takes us through little snippets of classified documents that show pictures revealing something that looks like an island in the ocean. During the 1950’s the US tries to destroy it, identifying it as a monster, with nuclear weaponry. Instead of killing it, however, it is later revealed that these giant creatures actually feed off of radiation. When we first meet one of our main characters, Dr. Ishiro Serizawa (well played by Ken Watanabe), the year is 1999, and he works on a project called Monarch after discovering fossilized remains of a giant creature, as well as two eggs. We also are introduced to Joe Brody (Bryan Cranston) and his wife, who work at a power plant in Japan that is reporting seismic activity. Something ruptures in the earth, and the core is shut down, but not before the plant collapses, and gases are released inside, killing his wife.

Fifteen years later, in present day, Joe’s son Ford (Aaron Taylor-Johnson) is in the Navy, returning home from duty, when he is told his father has been arrested. His wife tells him to go visit since it’s been so long, and Ford reluctantly goes to bail him out in Japan. He leaves behind his wife and his own son, to help his father. When he gets there, he finds that the town he grew up in is still considered a danger zone with radiation; but Joe, after being released, takes him back and the two realize they do not need radiation suits. There is no radiation. Joe’s prediction is that the plant did not fail, it was something else.

We learn that Serizawa still has the eggs; and when one of them hatches, we are introduced to our first monster in the film: a MUTO (Massive Unidentified Terrestrial Organism). The creature has wings and can fly, and has burning red eyes, flashes of light. The creature destroys the base that was holding it, and we find that there is another creature that’s hatched as well. These two creatures are searching for radiation to feed off of.

Then, the big creature returns. Gojira. The rest of the film tries to balance a narrative between Ford returning to his family, his family surviving the destruction of the monsters attacking each other, and the military trying to take down all the monsters. Serizawa suggests to let nature take its course, let the monsters fight; after all, no blast will destroy these creatures and they will simply feed off any radiation of any nuclear bombs that are exploded on them.

The film does a great job showing the monster fights, although the MUTO’s leave something to be desired as far as creative design. I do like that they gave Godzilla real eyes that we can see into. There is a wonderfully subtle scene between Ford and Godzilla, when Godzilla has fallen to the ground, presumably to die, and just stares into Ford’s eyes. It’s almost as if Godzilla’s saying, “It’s a living…” before disappearing into smoke. But it also lets us know that Godzilla has no issue with us. We’re just in his way. He’s trying to kill the MUTO’s.

The other parts of the film don’t bring much to the table, however, which is a shame. I liked the set up of Ford and Joe being like mirror opposites, with Ford being much more family oriented. That would have to come from the fact that he believed his father was too dedicated to his work and that he wants to provide and be a better husband/father. But that never goes anywhere, and we never get to know the humans enough to really care much about them. I liked Cranston’s character, and really believe they make a narrative mistake by leaving him out of most of the film. I also enjoyed Serizawa’s character as well–that stoic, quiet, knowing and understanding person who seems to have a connection with the monster as well. But most of the human scenes come off as very thin and underdeveloped.

Overall it satiates the appetite of anyone who wants to see a good “monster movie” and it makes Godzilla an appealing screen presence again. Much like Peter Jackson did with “King Kong”, Godzilla isn’t just a city crushing behemoth. While there isn’t as much personality as there is in “King Kong”, Godzilla shows us a side that even makes us root for him. The climactic battle between the monsters is certainly worthy of a theatrical viewing, and some of the cinematography is very well done. Grab a bag of popcorn, nestle in your seat, and enjoy watching the King of the Monsters back on the big screen.

My rating: :-)

Pacific Rim

July 24, 2013 by  
Filed under Movies

Guillermo Del Toro always fascinates me as a filmmaker because he’s one of the most joyful visual expressionists I’ve seen in my lifetime. He seems to have a knack for creating interesting looking creatures and putting them in colorful and sometimes dangerous worlds, and it’s always intriguing. He had wanted to film an adaptation of the classic H. P. Lovecraft short story “At The Mountains of Madness”, possibly one of Lovecraft’s most beloved stories. Unfortunately, I don’t know that the film will ever be made, which is a shame, because it’s one of my favorites. Though we get tastes of it in movies like John Carpenter’s “The Thing”, I don’t know we’ll ever really get the actual story in motion picture format. With Del Toro at leas you know it’d be visually stunning.

Instead, Del Toro teamed up with screenwriter Travis Beacham, writer of the 2006 remake of “Clash of the Titans”, and made what’s called a “kaiju” film–a movie about giant monsters–and I think some of the creatures were meant to be “similar” to Lovecraft’s Cthuhlu mythos universe. Well, I’m probably reaching, because what they came up with to fight these Kaijus are giant robots. I don’t think Lovecraft really wrote about those.

This is a very odd film. It’s saturated with a backstory that’s crammed into the first act as if we’re just supposed to be able to inhale decades of destruction and feel like the earth has been under attack and in a state of peril and understand where the technology came from to create mega robots. On top of that, we are supposed to care about characters we barely know and have complex backgrounds that aren’t given many payoffs or consequences. For instance, the main protagonist, a young strapping Jaeger pilot named Raleigh Becket (Charlie Hunnam) who loses his brother in a battle with one of the Kaijus. Jaegers, by the way, are the name given to the giant robots. Apparently two pilots must lock in to be able to absorb the power that Jaegers have in order to operate. There’s basically a “mind meld”, which means the two pilots must have things in common physically and emotionally and can lean on each other. In an ill fated battle, Raleigh loses his brother and is sent out of the program, doing construction work which looks pretty dangerous, but not very fulfilling.

Enter Marshall Stacker Pentecost (Idris Elba), five years later, tracking down his maverick pilot for another showdown with the Kaijus, who are continuing to destroy the earth and all our cities and ports. Apparently they come from under the sea, rather than outer space, but are considered “aliens” I think. If you’re following all of this, by the way, that’s good. Try and keep up. There’s more.

He is eventually partnered with a novice pilot but accomplished student, Mako (Rinko Kikuchi), who has a sketchy past that still haunts her but she is considered a perfect match for Raleigh, much to the chagrin to Pentecost. I’ll spare you the subplot that the United Nations decide to temporarily shut down the Jaeger project in favor of some sort of defense wall because it is imminently destroyed and serves as nothing more than a waste of about 10 minutes of screen time. The point is, Mako and Raleigh are meant to be Jaeger pilots.

But there’s a problem. She can’t let go of her haunting past, and that creates a rift in what’s called the “drift”, where the two minds meld before the Jaeger is fully operational. Pilots have to control their memories and feed them into their co-pilot in a way that isn’t aggressive or detrimental. They need to understand themselves in order to share them. So basically, if you ever happen to find yourself in a Jaeger mecha robot program, and your co-pilot is Amanda Bynes, you may as well jump out of the cockpit as soon as possible, and take your chances with gravity.

On top of all this, there’s another maverick cocky pilot (but he’s no Iceman) named Chuck (Robert Kazinsky) who doesn’t like Raleigh and thinks he’s bad news. But Chuck’s father Herc (Max Martini) has respect for Raleigh and knows the pain of losing his brother, even if Raleigh really doesn’t show it that much…because Charlie Hunnam isn’t that great of an actor. Sorry, Charlie. Loved you in “Undeclared” though.

Speaking of Charlie’s, there’s a miscalculated “humorous” subplot for comic relief I suppose with two nutjob scientists that come into play, trying to understand the Kaijus. One of them, Dr. Gottlieb (Burn Gorman), wants to find new ways to destroy the Kaijus. The other, Dr. Newton Geiszler (Charlie Day), who resembles Louis Tully, wants to study the Kaijus and understand them. He also comes up with the idea of mind melding with part of a brain they captured from one of the Kaijus. Of course Gottlieb and everybody else thinks that Newton is crazy, and he turns into Vinz Clortho and sends the giant Slore against them to kill them all.

Just kidding. However, I realize these two scientists are supposed to be funny; but the comedy kind of clangs instead of amuses. Charlie Day literally looks like he came in from “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” solely to crash the set. The only part of the comic sequences that work are with Ron Perlman who plays a black market Kaiju enthusiast, Hannibal Chau. Perlman is always good, even though his character is an unnecessary semi-villain.

Are you still with me? OK, so what Newton finds out is that the Kaijus are only sending their “soldier ants” and are actually preparing an even larger scale monster war, something beyond their “Categories” (Category 5 is the highest on their scale). He does this by mind melding with the brain of the Kaiju, of course, as he wanted to, and of course he’s right and knows how to destroy the Kaijus.

So let’s go back to Raleigh and Mako, who are given an old clunky Jaeger that runs on its own power, which comes in handy when they start facing some more technologically advanced Kaijus, and we find out that Mako’s backstory involves watching her family be destroyed by a Kaiju. But there’s a connection she has with one of the main characters that turns out to be one of the strongest and most emotional parts of the movie, and it works very well.

It took me a while to decide whether I liked this film, because as you can see, there’s a lot I have problems with. It’s very ambitious, it’s so chock full of backstory and exposition that sometimes it hulks around like a Jaeger itself. The battle scenes are tough to describe. In some ways it’s like watching an arcade video fighting game in slow motion. There are some dazzling effects, however, when these battles wind up destroying major (hopefully evacuated) cities.

Apart from some of the hackneyed “science” and major plot holes, I think I liked the main characters enough, and the relationships they develop, that it carried the film for me overall. You can lose all the other stuff and the film would be much shorter and probably more enjoyable. I think that Mako may have actually been a better central character, or Pentecost. Both actors respectively are incredibly strong and give top notch performances.

On balance, I did enjoy the film enough. But I really think that this being simply a movie does the story a disservice. While I’m sure there will be Mangas or comics that will go more into the backstory, I think this would’ve made a very entertaining Saturday morning cartoon series. It reminded me of shows like “Voltron” and “Transformers”, and even “G.I. Joe”.

I’d recommend seeing this film on the biggest possible screen to really get the idea of the scope of the battle sequences. Something like IMAX would be a great experience. I’m not sure whether the whole film will entertain you, but you will at least get your money’s worth of destruction. And for a summer popcorn movie, I guess that’s all you really need. Del Toro can do better, but this works enough for me.

My rating: :-)