A Quiet Place

April 25, 2018 by  

Given how low key John Krasinski’s remote family thriller “A Quiet Place” is, it might be a complete shocker that it was co-produced by Michael Bay. While there are flashes of explosions and explicit CGI, the best moments of the film are in its silence. Credit that to Krasinski and the cast, and the writing–that had to play all the notes you don’t hear.

The story takes place a few months after an apparent invasion of creatures that can attack by sound. Evidenced by numerous newspaper clippings (they apparently still will exist in 2020), we have figured that out, but can do nothing to stop them. Even the military gives up and says, “We can no longer protect you”. The Abbott family is couched away in the countryside of an unnamed area, away from the loud cities and condensed populations. We don’t get an “Independence Day” or “V” here. We get to see what an alien invasion would look like out in the middle of nowhere. Though touches of this were displayed by “10 Cloverfield Lane”, that was more of a “who’s the real monster?” type of creature feature.

Here, we know exactly who to root for and against. The creatures are lethal, gruesome, and horrifying. They look like a cross between a giant insect out of “The Mist”, and Venom. As said above, they hunt by sound only. Put up all the lights you want, cook all the fish you like, it won’t catch their attention. But scream, play with an electronic toy, or even run a TV with static–and, you’re dead.

When we’re introduced, the Abbotts have done a pretty good job of keeping up with how to protect themselves. Lee, the father (Krasinski), is very caring and attentive to his family of two boys and a girl–the girl, being deaf. His wife, Evelyn (Emily Blunt), becomes pregnant, complicating things further. But she, too, is protective and strong, and both of them appear to make a good team of husband/wife/mom/dad, to stave off the monsters. The young boy, Beau (Cade Woodward), is trying to be good, but is attracted to some things that can get you in trouble. We first spot them rummaging through an abandoned grocery store in town, finding things to provide sustenance. We also find later that they can still fish in the river nearby, and make food with grains and vegetables. But, they cannot eat on plates or with silverware. Yep, even those noises can attract the creatures.

After shopping, the family makes their way through a path, when suddenly it’s clear that Beau forgot to play by the rules. His brother Marcus (Noah Jupe) and deaf sister Regan (Millicent Simmonds, deaf in real life too), try to keep him safe. But the creatures are extremely deft, and it becomes a race for the father to try and save him.

We’re thrown about another year in, and now Evelyn is getting close to bearing a child. Lee has finished making a soundproof baby room in the basement, and also has developed a new hearing aid for Regan, who still thinks it’s a waste of time to do so. But, the hearing aid becomes an important plot point further in the story. And, it paints a good picture of Lee as a guy who really wants to do whatever he can to ensure his family survives. Obviously, a hearing aid will alert Regan to danger. Without that, she is oblivious to where the creatures are and when they can pounce on you.

What drives the stakes up for this family is how disconnected they are from civilization–Lee makes vain attempts to communicate through Morse code in his work room; and, the fact that they have a baby on the way makes it clear that no matter how quiet you can try to keep your kids, a newborn is nearly impossible. Not to mention, with no medical aid or hospital visits, it’s impossible to know when Evelyn’s going to give birth.

The writers know how to play with the sound complications as well–you can tell they must’ve drafted quite a bit of rewrites to get it accurate, because it’s completely believable in its execution. We are always on pins and needles, waiting for someone to stub their toe or run into something when they’re not looking–all the mundane things we’re vulnerable to. It’s interesting to note there’s a scene where birds are flying around, indicating that these things can’t fly obviously. They clearly would be affected by the sound of the birds, but they can’t kill them. Just a nice little touch added.

Krasinski’s direction is pitch perfect, always building tension and giving us white knuckles. The performances are outstanding; but probably the best is Blunt’s because of what she has to endure while trying to be quiet, but also carrying a human being inside her and protecting him when he’s born. Simmonds also does a great job of being very aware for someone who can’t hear. And it’s also nice to see that the whole family can speak in sign language, clearly showing how much they don’t consider Regan a handicap or a burden. They’re a loving family and we are fully invested emotionally in them.

And it is an emotional experience watching this film as much as it is visceral, and thrilling. The whole film works, throughout, never a dull moment, and never a moment where we’re waiting for that other shoe to drop. And once it does, and we’re seeing the creatures in full, it’s pretty terrifying.

My rating: :D

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